Saturday, 12 July 2014

Survey results: 'Are there any other comments you'd like to make on the campaign?'

This post looks at the answers to the third question on the survey. There are a lot of similar answers between the responses to questions 2 & 3, with respondents offering suggestions for the development of the campaign:


Are there any other comments you'd like to make on the campaign?


  • There should be training for all commercial drivers, not just HGV drivers. 
  • Yes we need to get Cameron out of power 
  • Don't believe the words coming out of Gilligan's mouth. Words have been spoken many times and are quickly forgotten. We need action and firm deadlines by which we can hold them to account.
  • Keep going, great job you are doing. 
  • I'm really impressed with the amount of effort that's gone into this and the progress that has been made.
  • I think 20 mph speed limits would be a quick win. Enforced and segregated cycle lanes would be great but I think the cost will put any LA off. 
  • Keep going!! I like the 20mph speed limits too - this would be a help. 
  • Valid and valuable. Requires the co-ordination that you are seeking to deliver.
  • Also need to ensure it doesn't persecute the vehicle driver as well (HGV/car) as a lot of us drive too. 
  • I totally support the campaign and appreciate that this takes time and careful planning but results need to be achieved and to be seen to be taking place. Andrew Gilligan and all those involved in ensuring that cycling is made safer need to start making effective decisions. 
  • Thank you for doing this for the rest of us.
  • Although banning HGVs is intrinsically appealing because they are involved in many accidents, it is  very impractical and is likely to cause more friction between cyclists and motorists. Training and separation of road users is most important.
  • we need to show the government and Boris Johnson up for there hypocrisy and broken promises.
  • Work with Clean Air London on a campaign to clean up London's air, which in most places is way above recommended levels/in breach of EU levels. 
  • There needs to be a commitment to spending more on cycling infrastructure. We should also work to ensure that even the existing laws relating to bad/dangerous road use are enforced fairly.
  • Nice work!
  • Well done - really good is exists
  • It is very hard to know where to start improving cycle facilities in this country. Comparisons are often made to how differently things are done in other European countries such as the Netherlands, however there has been much greater investment in infrastructure over many years to achieve those results.
  • I'd like to see rules bought in to help cyclists help themselves.  Drivers are compelled by law to wear their seatbelt and I'd love to see cyclists equally compelled to wear an appropriate helmet and also be made to wear high-vis vests or jackets.  Too many cyclists endanger themselves by not taking these simple measures that can greatly reduce their risk and are entirely within their control!
  • Good luck and well done on getting this far - you're making progress and we're all behind you.
  • Cyclists need positive marketing - at the moment they are too often viewed with aggression, contempt or lack of compassion from drivers. Drivers don't understand how vulnerable we are, and cyclists often don't understand how their behaviour is difficult/aggravating for drivers.
  • King Street Hammersmith has had a dedicated cycle lane for many years - have a look !
  • Keep up the good work.
  • You're doing a great job. Thank you.
  • Precedents are Dublin and Paris. Deep down everyone knows this makes sense. With a bit of relentless pressure I can see some very positive changes coming about.
  • Keep up the positive energy, and keep it clean!
  • We should be focusing on a cycling provision we'd be happy for young children to use - that's the test of whether it's adequate
  • Enough consultation, time for leadership and action. Also I don't think more CCTV cameras are ever the answer.
  • thanks to those pioneering this
  • Improving the quality of roads in general would make a huge difference to my commute. Big potholes and uneven patching of roadworks make life difficult at best, and in some instances force cyclists to swerve suddenly. Essex Road is a joke, I thought my brain was going to rattle out of my head. A friend has lost teeth to a pothole on a dark night.
  • We are getting there, albeit slowly, keep up the pressure.
  • Concentrate on aspects that have realistic potential. HIV cameras or banning in cities will never happen. Too expensive. It's a lot more to do with changing conception of cycling by non-cyclists. HIV drivers more concerned with weight of traffic and delivery times. As more people shop online this will only get worse. 
  • At an early stage we should think how to address the recklessness and indiscipline of some cyclists, who feed the hostility of other road users from which the rest of us suffer.
  • A ban on HGVs would cripple the economy of London.A ban at rush hour might work, though. My husband is a cyclist and I want him safe but it's a two-way street. I think cyclists should get the chance to drive an HGV and see what the drivers can and can't see from their cabs. 
  • The cycle route 3 from waterloo to vauxhall is bloody awful!! Maybe he should be made to cycle down that and then will realise that it's not enough for cyclists to simply paint a symbol on the road.
  • None, keep up the good work, thank you. 
  • Cyclist need to respect the road and not go through red light and drivers need to respect the cyclist and give them space to cycle
  • keep up the good work!
  • make cycling awareness part of driving licence
  • Talk to Chris Boardman! Get him on-board!
  • I think that driving tests should incorporate an obligatory day of cycling on the roads and somehow be a part of the test. If more motorists were aware what it is like to cycle they might be more considerate on the roads. I myself and a driver/cyclist/pedestrian and when I started cycling it made me more aware as a driver.
  • Pedestrians are also a problem for cyclists!
  • Cyclists should also obey the rules of road - i.e not jumping traffic lights etc
  • keep up the good work, sorry I cannot get involved right now I am about to set off on a bike ride around the world to raise money for RoadPeace, you are welcome to circulate if you see fit:
  • https://mydonate.bt.com/fundraisers/laidbackrich
  • In order of precedence 
  • 1 segregated cycle lanes
  • 2 banning HGVs in central London
  • 3 20mph speed limits
  • 4 Gilligan's plan is not good enough
  • 5 replan traffic usage in central London
  • Good luck! You are fab. 
  • Keep up the fine work!
  • I am not a cyclist but have witnessed the other side. how some cyclists abuse that the highway code does not apply to them. That cyclist must have lights on the front and back of their bikes and appropriate safety gear.
  • I write primarily as an experienced car driver but also as a cyclist and motorcyclist.
  • I do not necessarily view that the terrible toll of accidents involving cyclists is any one party's fault. 
  • We, including pedestrians, are ALL entitled users of the highways and need to find a sensible and safe way to co-exist.
  • More and better cycle lanes would help (although, in my experience, even then, including as a pedestrian, one is at the mercy of other, often, aggressive, cyclists).
  • Regardless of any forthcoming, highway improvements, better training for ALL road users is essential. 
  • Cyclists, drivers and pedestrians need to be aware of each other's limitations and faults.
  • Keep up the good work!
  • Resist the pressure on cyclists to act as iff the risks of cycling must all be mitigated by cyclists themselves (shiny vests, helmets, christmas-tree lights etc)
  • Lobby the Mayor to put these suggestions into law.
  • Some training for cyclists (eg. Highway Code stuff, like don't undertake lorries...)
  • Safety  provisions  in all  new HGV's  sold.
  • Segregated cycle lanes everywhere is ideal but while we don't have those and the ideal may never be realized, each cyclist will have to take more care and not to compete with big vehicles and cars. It's always cyclists who suffer whoever is in the wrong.
  • Make London greener. 
  • Ban HGV use in London (Zones 1-3) between 07:00 and 21:00.
  • Keep it up
  • An idea: Your list gives many very important areas to focus on.  As you say, there are many long standing (and respected) cycling groups who are also campaigning.  Would it be an idea to work in tandem with the other groups so that each group focusses on a particular area.  That way many areas can be covered.
  • Keep up the pressure and good work!
  • Don't become anti other road users !
  • Sorry I have more than a fulltime job but public awareness is rising. Having been cycling in London since the seventies and it is so much better - though probably too many of us on the roads.
  • Push on!!!! I cycled for years but stopped 5 years ago because of the dangers (and having 2 children). I now drive very warily but respectfully. It took me years to stop evasive driving around cyclists. They make drivers nervous! especially when they come from behind you on both sides of a car! I so want to start cycling again. HGV drivers should get training AND part of that training is to PUT THEM ON A BIKE FOR A WHOLE DAY (OR EVEN A WEEK) THROUGHOUT THE DAY AND IN PARTICULAR RUSH HOUR PERIODS. This should be a compulsory requirement of securing an HGV licence and regular vehicle licence............. 
  • 20mph limits only work if they are policed otherwise they're pointless 
  • Keep motor vehicles out of all cycle lanes, even for unloading and road maintenance.
  • Banning HGVs would be great but it will never happen.
  • Thank you.
  • Keep it up - look to European countries with high cycle usage for benchmarks/guidance
  • I think it's about behaviour change. We can all share the roads, but we need more mutual respect and less aggression to do so safely. It's difficult to know what the concrete actions are that will bring that about, but could byelaws be introduced to put the assumption of blame on drivers as in Holland?
  • We need a substantial improvement in "shared use" facilities: i.e when shared between pedestrians and cyclists. Shared use should not be seen as an option for local authorities. Pedestrians and cyclists have totally conflicting agendas when using these facilities. Cyclist are using them to get from A to B as quickly as possible (usually on their daily commute). Pedestrians are not devoting the same level of concentration. They are on the phone, they are talking to each other etc. This is not a criticism of either party, it's just what happens in the real world. What is needed is clearly delineated 'lanes' in all cases, not just in Hyde Park and a process of education for both cyclists and pedestrians. In the long term, dedicated cyclist only paths are the solution, but some sort of immediate solutions need to be applied along the lines I have suggested. 
  • Two years ago I was in Barcelona and they had segregated cycle  Lanes. This is the way forward
  • Also there should be a mandatory law introduced for cyclist to wear hi visual aids, helmets. And trainining for cyclist , particular those who go through red lights, in a pedestrian crossing. General comment there are too many vehicles on the road and London is over populated. The public transport system is not working....
  • Keep it up!
  • Great work, keep it up. 
  • Get people talking about why they/others are so ready to scapegoat cyclists
  • there shouldn't be vehicle with blind spots on streets where people walk and cycle! this is unacceptable! we must ban these vehicles!
  • Well done keep up the pressure don't be fobbed off with Elastoplast policies.
  •  good progress I suppose partly because it's good sense. Keep using the death toll in your discussions so none of those people died in vain.
  •  Keep up the good work. It might be good to lobby the houses of parliament. How many MP's cycle round London get some-one to speak out . My MP cycles, DR Sarah Wolleston
  • Just need to keep thinking out of the box. Remember the impact of Dads for \justice. How about asking some of the LOndon marathon runners to don T shirts we're running for cycle Lanes in London. ofr something similar but more catchy. 
  •  Wishing this campaign great success. 
  • https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/strict-liability-law-for-motorists
  • This is incredibly top heavy, most successful campaigns are lead from the grassroots and empower individuals into action, To get people active they need to feel included, answering a questionnaire with limited response options is not the way to do that. This is further worsened by the fact that no information was actually provided by the email this was attached to. It states that the Gilligan report is bad but not why, it talks about the mayor's cycling vision but gives no info about it, what form would would training for cyclists take? And why must we focus on 1 issue, A holistic attempt to tackle the problem both strengthens the argument and campaign.
  • Giving only an option of "segregated cycle lanes" was unclear. It should have said "***physically*** segregated cycle lanes" as in practice councils count a dotted line on a bit of road as a "segregated cycle lane". In the US and Canada they are called "protected bike lanes" which better describes exactly the job they - they actually protect cyclists from traffic. Hope this helps for future campaigns .
  • So far, very successful. !000s of cyclists are very visible !! Especially in one place.
  • Keep up the good work.
  • If I had an option to push for two things the second thing would have been banning HGVs in central London.
  • Keep going, top work :o)
  • Keep up the good work!
  • Segregated cycle lanes should be as wide as possible, preferably with solid separation and with traffic reduced to a single lane in the central areas of towns and cities.
  • I want to see the push extended to other big UK cities like Manchester etc
  • As a middle aged woman I want to cycle far more but until I can do so separated from traffic I consider it far too dangerous
  • We should also campaign to stop GMOs as they are severely dangerous in my opinion. If you want to know more about this, you can look at the video in the following link. 
  • We should support the EU in condemning the illegal filthy air quality in London and demand immediate action to close roads to all motor vehicles whenever air quality on those roads comes anywhere close to exceeding safe limits..
  • While there needs to be balance there is still too much victim blaming and focus on cyclists. There also needs to be focus on other vulnerable road users,  in fact the government, TFL and DFT need to overhaul road design old and more importantly new.
  • More random drug checks on all erratic drivers.
  • It's great. Keep up the good work! 
  • Keep up the good work!
  • More people are cycling and they need to be encouraged.   Global warming is happening as 99% of our scientists all agree, but it still, 30 years on, and it soon it will be too late, gets little coverage in the media.   We need to reduce our carbon emissions by taking petrol driven vehicles off the road now and encourage the use of bicycles.    
  • Too many ideas. Mine is the best, the most effective short and  long term, as it has a profound effect on the minds of motorists in Europe,  thus having altered their behaviours and attitudes to cyclists.  Anything else is a waste of our efforts and money.  It is behaviour/culture  we need to change, not infrastructure.
  • There is little public money for the radical infrastructure changes needed to have any effect and it would take far too long to create.  Also we cannot ever overcome the social stratification prevalent in the UK.
  • That has a bearing too on motorists attitudes to cyclists.  
  • Keep up the great work.
  • Good work - keep it up!
  • Keep up the pressure. This is the beginning.
  • It shouldn't be single issue/solution. Getting more people cycling benefits a city in MANY different ways. Focussing on a single improvement will never be enough. Cycling provision must be holistic!
  • We need to think about how to change the whole culture; at the moment it is "us against them" mentality on the part of drivers; they should accept that cyclists, as well as pedestrians, are a normal part of street life.
  • Have you been in touch with Sustrans?
  • Sock it to them. 
  • A dearly loved friend was killed in Barnet by a lorry driver and I am passionate that safety comes first!   Her death left her husband, two grown children and three grandchildren totally devastated!  Please, never again, for anyone!
  • I think its a great and noble campaign and wish you every success. Sadly I am time poor for the foreseeable future due to personal circumstances. But I will keep watching avidly and hope to contribute when I can. 
  • I thank you for being a champion for people like myself and others who want change.
  • It might be a good idea to make cycle helmets and high vis compulsary to make cyclists safer. To hire out Barclays bikes without helmets is stupid, especially a problem as tourists who aren't as used to cycling in London use a lot of them. 
  • I think it is very important that it is pursued
  • Are Boris bikes a good idea? People that use them are a liability, I give them a wide berth. Anecdotally my friends only use them when drunk and there are too many bikes on the road without them. And anyway, weren't they Ken's idea?
  • I think cycling can be expensive for some users and others have cycles they dont use. Maybe if there was a website to help recycle bikes for people to buy and sell
  • too modest
  • The campaign must be one which works within the existing road system and culture. We need to show how we can cycle safely in the present - as well as introducing changes. have other road users been asked for their input? Or do we just continue an 'us and them' situation?
  • Keep going.
  • Important to link with other groups e.g. Stop Killing Cyclists and their big November event.
  • Please link up with the London cycling campaign if not already
  • Pedestrians also need to be made more away of the dangers of walking in front of the cycles, motor bike riders riding in the cycle lane with the solid line, I was almost knocked off my bike last week by one.
  • Should be more joined up with LCC: I was disappointed that space for cycling wasn't listed as one of your options to focus on. 
  • (Segregated cycle lanes is the closest option but isn't the same thing)
  • Keep up the good work!
  • I would like the whole of the UK to become a more cycle friendly place. It is great to see changes being discussed for London but don't forget the rest of us. I cycle almost daily and practically every day I have a near miss or an incident because I have to share overcrowded roads with HGVs, buses and cars.
  • Many more dedicated cycle lanes, training for drivers and training for cyclists would be a big step in the right direction.
  • Don't ignore the need to encourage better cycling. If we do that, we take the moral high ground. In truth a solution would involve all of the above and improving cycling standards is part of that mix. 
  • Segregated infrastructure great but a harder win than radar on lorries 
  • This campaign has gathered quite a lot of momentum; from seemingly out of nowhere.  I'd like to see this campaign joined up with LCC's campaigning; your supporters converted to LCC members; and LCC to step up its campaigning/ marketing etc to capitalise on the interested generated by this campaign.
  • I would like to see cycling really prioritized in the city - its all just words at the moment.  
  • keep up the good work!
  • Yes, well done.  Make those lazy and entirely un-proactive ministers account for their lethargy towards road safety.  Example of why road safety is a joke?  Speed bumps that just happen to fit precisely within the track of most cars so you can still hammer over them?  Speed cameras - advertise where they all are and then let 'motorist guidance devices' issue verbal warnings so the speeding motorist can behave themselves for 200 metres before getting back up to speed?  Bit like me ringing the police station to ask where the officers are presently located to give me time to rob a bank isn't it?  They wouldn't do that but yet again as a car is involved all common sense disappears.
  • I would like campaigning for family cycling-almost impossible now in London. I mean being able to go from a to b with your little cyclist(s), nobody having to be in danger or break the law. Maybe allowing cycling on pavements and all the parks is the answer to that.
  • Spread is further than just London.
  • I think you are doing a great job, well done
  • There are no London-specific solutions.  All the problems are national ones.
  • Great work - keep it up.
  • The focus on HGV's seems to be very heavy - somewhat unfairly. 
  • Keep it up!
  • I did like cycling ministers suggestion that cyclist can run pavement to avoid risky road. It is very helpful in rainy days. Somehow I feel car runs faster in rainy weather splash water and road is slippery. And I found after 8pm most pavements are empty, specially rainy days there are less people walking on the pavement. So why 
  • There should be a NEW DEAL for cyclists.
  • I think the campaign can be broadened to other cities and create an urban social movement around the issues it has highlighted to date.
  • Hand out high visibility jackets,saturate London.
  • Warn every cyclist about not wearing high visibility clothing
  • Enforcement of speed limits - and the rolling out of 20mph across the capital and elsewhere.
  • The disgraceful tragetting of cyclists in the recent 'crackdown on lawbreaking by road users' was truly astounding - surreal. This victim-blaming by Boris Johnson, Andrew Gilligan and the Met needs to be tackled. Whatever cyclists may or may not do in accordance with road rules - it is stupendously obvious that thay will end up harming themselves rather than others primarily. That drivers are continually tolerated with their actual life-and-limb-endangering behaviour - flouting speed limits the majority of the time, is abominable. 20mph means 20mph maximum.
  • 20mph limits need to be set as the default - this would simplify the process of enforcement and also work better economically, with no necessity to provide extra, and costly, signage
  • Better road planning for cuclists
  • Keep going!
  • Well done on getting this far. Now keep the pressure up on those in power to make things change for the better for cyclists.
  • Helmets should be make compulsory to wear. 
  • No HGV in cities during day
  • Keep going, nb re volunteering below, keen to help but teaching until June in Istanbul at present.
  • Thank you for having this campaign.
  • Since the campaign the police are stopping cyclist for tiny things eg having front bike tyre on white line at traffic light and threatening £50 fines.
  • Let cyclist use pavements but penalize aggressive cyclist who spoil it for others
  • While it is important to put pressure on policy makers cyclists' organisations can play a part by disseminating information about good practice and safety guidelines. 
  • Good work! This is really important, cycling needs to be seen as part of the solution and it's image changed in our car-obsessed society.
  • ally cycling needs with pedestrian needs as too often there is a danger of seeing cyclists as a 'special case' or fomenting division between cycling and walking, and those with mobility difficulties/older people/ people with prams
  • Put people on foot first. Campaign for cyclists to act in a safe and thoughtful manner. Be the better petson and csmpaign for compulsory safety measures such as lights and bells to observe the highway code. Create a good name for cyclist behaviour to take back the moral high ground and advance the case for cycling. What about the winter / rainy weather? Trams and cycles=all-weather transport and work in harmony...
  • Keep it up, you're doing a magnificent job.
  • well done and thx for all your hard work!
  • Thank you so much for taking this initiative!
  • There needs to be clarity about designated cycle routes & cycle paths (some ignorant cyclists think it's OK to cycle on a narrow pavement past a bus stop full of people waiting & about to board a bus, because they've seen that it is a recommended cycle route & are confusing it with a cycle path)  & about the so-called "shared spaces". Where I live there is no signage bar a few metallic cycle signs embedded in the paving stones. As one "shared space" comes into existence, with no definition, it leads people to think that ALL pavements are "shared spaces". 
  • Thank you for your efforts so far. I wish I had the time to help, but you have my moral support!
  • I think that goals should meet two criteria: 1) are reasonable (e.g., possible to achieve) and 2) have an impact.
  • I do not believe that several on the above list are feasible, or would measurably impact safety.
  • On the other hand, I do believe that segregated cycle lanes satisfy both criteria.
  • 20 mph speed limits except for trunk roads together with the closure of all rat runs to all but cyclists and emergency vehicles. 
  • Get more people involved in 'cycle to work' days & 'days out on your bike' campaigns. The more people who cycle the more 'normal' it will seem. 
  • I think it was a great campaign which reached more people than pretty much any other, thanks so much for doing this.
  • I'd like the relationship between cyclists and other traffic to remain friendly. Let's keep this debate friendly and try to avoid any anomisity towards HGV drivers and taxis, for example
  • I drive through Brixton every day, which is very busy.  Cyclists are most vulnerable when:
  • 1.  you can't see them (ie. no lights, no high vis) 
  • 2.  when they weave in and out of traffic - it is very frightening to watch
  • 3.  when they overtake on the inside - especially if there is traffic needing to merge left to make a left hand turn
  • I think there needs to be education for cyclists and all drivers and I agree that HGV drivers need to have extra training and safety mirrors / signs.
  • Good luck and thank-you.
  • Cycling should be for the a better future and a way of living
  • Congratulations on what has been achieved so far!
  • It seems the relentless vigilance and energy works.  The powers that be increasingly rely on inertia.  More power to you elbow. I may be able to contribute.
  • Thank you for your hard work.
  • Thank you for your hard work.  I'm sorry I can't volunteer my time at the moment (on a very demanding study programme), but I do really appreciate efforts to make London a city where cycling is the norm.
  • Yes. I have been fortunate to live in a number of great European cities (Amsterdam and Paris for the greatest duration). London is awful in comparison but I realise that statement is not useful on it's own as it is fairly obvious. However I think there are some very useful factors that can be learnt from these other cities. 
  • I will just highlight three; 
  • 1) For the bike hire scheme by barclays has not reached the point of critical mass. It needs to be massively increased. Currently I think it is useful for commuters who have a regular journey so know exactly what they are doing (where to pick up the bike and drop it off etc.) but for any other use it is extremely frustrating as there are not enough bikes/bike stations and so far too often you are left searching. This scheme needs to be embraced more; greater quantity of bike stations - scatter them everywhere (and make these into bike stations with places to safely lock up normal bikes for those not using the scheme.) This would help get more people biking which I think would affect the culture.  It is the culture in Amsterdam that is so admirable - everyone bikes. that is what we are all longing for and would make the greatest shift in cyclist satisfaction and safety.
  • 2) Paris is a notoriously fantastic city to wander around whether by bike or on foot.... there are many reasons for that; it is beautiful.....London has it's own beauty.... but there are other factors The roads are wider which means they can have traffic but also wide wide spaces for people to walk down with out being crammed out - far too often waking or biking in london is a stress as it is  far too crowded - therefore more space is needed for the walkers and bikers. So segregate and increase the pavement size and (shocking though it may be) the roads of london may have to give up  some space to make way. Which leads to the third and most significant.
  • 3) Reclaim the streets; as Boris alludes to in his intro for the mayors vision the roads and travelling ways have been taken over by engines and it is time to massively reduce the quantity of both cars, vans and lorries on the streets of london. Far too often I see many cars in queues with just the driver in them (and they are not the taxis). People are driving cars far too casually. They need to be heavily discouraged (ideally stopped).  The streets of London could be quite efficiently converted into a place for busses, taxis, bikes and pedestrians with space for a vastly improved, efficient joined up delivery service (with communication between all those needing deliveries so that it can be run without so many wasted journeys.) It ouwld make life happier and better not just for cyclists but for all Londoners who walk anywhere, who use public transport, all tourists (who surprisingly don't own cars!) A London which is less noisy, cleaner air to breathe and quicker to make those journeys around the great city.
  • I know it's difficult but I think that segregated cycle lanes are the single most important thing to get the next tranche of cyclists, who are currently deterred by "Too much traffic" to cycle in London. There would be a significant increase in numbers of cyclists and make them even more of a force to be reckoned with.
  • I live in outer London and feel that our local cycling needs are often ignored in favour of central London issues  Granter there are more cyclists in central London and more frequent incidents but that doesn't mean outer London should be forgotten.
  • Harsher penslties for drivers who kill and mame cyclists on the roads. 
  • We need cycle lanes asap! Other countries in Europe have them and look at their statistics.
  • It's difficult to pick only one thing on the list above, but as the survey forces me to do so, I have chosen what I think is the most important long-term measure.  Really though the campaign needs to be multi-pronged and able to react according to changing political circumstances and events as they develop on the roads outside.
  • In my opinion the issue of integrated transport is not given enough airtime. I think if it was easier to park and ride (bicycles) on overground and national rail through vastly improved cycle parking AND an education campaign on proper locking of bikes we would get a happier and more secure environment for all transport modes. More cyclists who feel able to modify transport needs as and when through better facilities and greater exercising of secure and low maintenance options would lead to greater empowerment and perhaps even sensitivity to the communal needs and options that co-mingle between public and private transport modes. There should likewise be better facilities options for access to above ground rail networks during all working hours not just for folding bikes. Look at Berlin they actually charge a small fee for the additional carriage of a bicycle which could be an option here particularly with the design of overground style trains and better platform access.
  • Just to get the message out there using all media as a "vehicle".
  • I clicked Banning HGVs, but I don't think that will ever happen. CS2 is a joke. I just drove through Wandsworth and spotted a 2 meter section of blue tarmac sandwiched in the middle of 4 lanes of traffic with a bus on top of it. 20mph speed limits seem restrictive, and it's a drag driving in London, but maybe that would reduce the amount of traffic? But where do you draw the line? Central London? How does that help the large number of cyclists riding in from further out?
  • I'd also say that I'm not a big fan of Dutch cycling - I'm not a Dutch cyclist, I have a long way to go, so I do it at speed.I don't want to be relegated to a segregated lane, stuck behind the slowest rider. But then again I'm not so selfish, so if that is what is wanted, I'll support it.
  • The biggest difference I've noticed is that when cycling in Europe, drivers give you a lot of space. I'm not sure where this is down to a greater respect for cyclists, and where it's because there is a legal presumption of the motorist's guilt. But that seems to really help.
  • Two final points:
  • 1. When the spate of deaths was highlighted last November, the police stood around at junctions picking up cyclist for breaking rules. As far as I know, very few deaths are caused by cyclists breaking rules, and sometimes those rules are broken to keep the cyclist safe. I tend to abide by the law, just so that I don't give them the satisfaction, but there are still certain junctions where I'll hop across the road to keep out of trouble (have you tried turning right into Clerkenwell Road?). In general, cyclists don't cause accidents, drivers do. So why target cyclists?
  • 2. A few cyclists are incredibly dangerous and disregarding of the rights of others. As are a few drivers. I'd like to see that kind of behaviour punished, rather than a blanket demonising of people who put their own safety above the rules of the road.
  • As I am a disabled motorist, who could no more cycle than fly, I hesitate to express a view, except to wish the campaign well.
  • I will however say that as a driver it seems to me that many cyclists appear to be  unaware of how vulnerable they are. I would prefer to see more segregated cycle lanes, as one finds in some European cities.
  • You need to establish the REAL truth about committment and money available and DATES before going any further - if it is in writing we know where we stand else it becomes a waste of time.  I have tried several times through GLA members of all political persuasions and even after having been provided by the Green member a breakdown of the 913 million, still no one can provide answers or is willing to.
  • The truth must out now.
  • Good work guys :) Keep it up! London cyclists love you x
  • I know you have asked for us to define "one measure" but I actually think there needs to be a comprehensive cycling strategy, with some clear targets for increasing journeys by bike and reducing accidents.
  • The real focus should be on making EVERY road in London/UK safe to cycle on. Cycling should be normalised, with helmets, lycra and high-viz clothing unnecessary. 
  • Superhighways focus too much on one route. Training for cyclists makes it sound like cyclists are the problem. I completely agree with Chris Boardman's Time to Choose Cycling report
  • Good luck and well done
  • We need to keep the focus away from penalising cyclists who make minor infringements as this tends to be blown out of all proportion and is used to distract from the real issues.  During the recent police campaign to clamp down on all road users at dangerous junctions on my route to work the police were missing from the junctions that create difficulties for cyclists but standing at a number of junctions which are generally not problematic and pulling cyclists up for such things as using a 2 foot length of pavement to turn safely into a back street rather than go to the main junction - better planning could see a cycle route added in such places so that the pavement could be shared for that very short stretch.
  • I think segregated cycle lanes would have a massive impact on the safety and popularity of cycling - it's the only real solution to make cycling truly more safe in London and as more people cycle it will be taken more and more seriously and car drivers will no longer be able to see cyclists as us and them - it will become more like Holland and Denmark. 
  • Training for all motorists and cyclists is also a good idea - along with raising the awareness of the safety of cyclists in cities.
  • Segregation comes later but will take too long to implement to help in the short term. I'm not even sure London is suitable for it until most vehicles have been excluded from the centre of town.
  • It needs a thorough hollistic review of the entire London transport network.
  • Keep up the good work.
  • I think we have to keep up the pressure.
  • Thank you so much for doing this. 
  • You're doing a great job. Thank you. 
  • HGV drivers are not the only danger.  Bus drivers, taxi drivers and motorists share some responsibility for cutting across cycle lanes and causing danger to cyclists.
  • Pushing for a mass collection of film footage, so that motorists and the general public can get a cyclists perspective of London roads, which could promote a strong argument for raising improving conditions.
  • The roads are what they are.  Putting a strip of green tarmac on by the side of the road will not make it safer.  This is money wasted.
  • Pedestrians are a great danger to cyclists.  They are largely slow, unaware and prone to stepping in the road, often without looking. They need educating too.
  • Great work - amazing to have seen this grow from a conversation. 
  • Can we have a memorial in London for cyclists who have perished whilst going about their journey?
  • Yes, concentrating on getting cyclists to realise that they are road users, and stop them jumping red lights and using pavements.
  • Cae drivers have to pay insurance etc. and when a cyclist causes an accident and then tries to blame the car driver it is unfair.
  • Red light cameras installed at most intersection (one's that actually work as well) would force drivers to obey the road rules as well, as well as generating income for the govt.  Win win.
  • well done getting a prompt reply from Andrew Gilligan
  • Well done to everyone so far.
  • In order to get to where we want to be, this campaign is going to have to grow and be able to put enough pressure where it is needed to make things happen. The majority of people would love to see a more cycle-friendly London, but are we reaching them?
  • Yes, please Encourage all your signatories to support the LCC's #Spaceforcycling campaign by emailing their local council candidates and going on the Big Ride on Saturday 17th May